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How to create the perfect ambiance by choosing the right color temperature

Are you frustrated with shopping for chandeliers and pendant lights? You have probably spent all day trying to understand whether or not you need warm lighting or cool lighting? Do not worry! We have got you covered.

First, let’s break down what is color temperature. According to Westing House Lighting, color temperature is a way to describe the light appearance from a light bulb. It is measured in degrees of Kelvin (K) on a scale from 1,000 to 10,000. Normally, commercial and residential lighting fall between 2500K and 6500K. Color temperatures between:

  • 2000K and 3000K are denoted as “warm white”. These bulbs emit an orange-tinted, cozy, “warm” light
  • 3100K and 4500K are denoted as “cool white”. These bulbs emit a bright or “cool” white light
  • 4600K to 6500K are denoted as “daylight”. These bulbs mimic daylight (i.e., a blue-white light).

Matching color temperature to your environment

Now that we have explained the differences between “warm” and “cool” light. Here are guidelines for creating the right ambiance for your space. 

How to create the perfect ambiance by choosing the right color temperature - Coastal & High Rise

Please note that these are not hard and fast rules. Choosing the right color temperature depends on your taste and your home’s or business’ access to natural light. For example, you might want a color temperature between 4600K and 6500K that mimics daylight in your bedroom because it will help you to get moving much quicker in the morning than the warm and cozy soft-white chandelier OR you might want to have the flexibility to set the mood of your space by being able to switch between the color temperatures. For the latter, you might want to pick a bulb that provides that feature and consider installing a dimmer switch. 

Also, it is important to note that the terms “warm” and “cool” light are misleading when examining the Kelvin scale because the “cool” light is actually hotter than “warm” light. The terms "warm" and "cool" aren’t intended to describe the actual temperature of the flame used to produce the light but rather the aesthetic these lights generate.

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The featured pendant light can be purchased here: https://www.coastalhighrise.com/products/firefly-tree-lights

Citations:

“Color Temperature (Kelvin).” Ceiling Fans, www.westinghouselighting.com/color-temperature.aspx.

Null, Christopher. “How to Optimize Your Home Lighting Design Based on Color Temperature.” TechHive, TechHive, 23 Feb. 2015, www.techhive.com/article/2887143/how-to-optimize-your-home-lighting-design-based-on-color-temperature.html.